Dr Samantha Beck

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Research Associate

Samantha.Beck.ic@uhi.ac.uk

+44 (0)1463 273568

Dr Beck's background is in molecular ecology and population genetics. She started her career examining phylogeographic patterns of a Southeast Asian killifish, followed by the documentation of genetic diversity within and between endangered populations of Arctic charr in North Wales as part of her BSc and MRes (respectively), in the Molecular Ecology and Fisheries Genetics Laboratory at Bangor University. She recently completed my PhD at Hólar University/University of Iceland where she collected and reared multiple morphs of Arctic charr and used phenotypic and genetic tools to understand the influence of egg size for intraspecific diversification.

Research interests

Her research interests specialise in the use of genomic and morphometric tools to resolve fine-scale population structure and associated phenotypic variation, including the role of natural selection on intraspecific diversification. She is also interested in the application of molecular tools to the conservation and management of aquatic species.

Current projects

  • Atlantic salmon stock assessment: Integrating genetics (AS3IG).
  • Adaptive management of barriers in European rivers (AMBER).
  • Populations genetics of Arctic charr in North Wales
  • Influence of egg size for the diversification of wild Arctic charr morphs

Publications

Beck, S. V., Carvalho, G. R., Barlow, A., Rüber, L., Hui Tan, H., Nugroho, E., Wowor, D., Mohd Nor, S. A., Herder, F., Muchlisin, Z. A., & de Bruyn, M. (2017). Plio-Pleistocene phylogeography of the Southeast Asian Blue Panchax killifish, Aplocheilus panchax. PLOS ONE, 12(7), e0179557. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0179557

Beck, S. V., Räsänen, K., Ahi, E. P., Kristjánsson, B. K., Skúlason, S., Jónsson, Z. O., & Leblanc, C. A. (2019). Gene expression in the phenotypically plastic Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus): A focus on growth and ossification at early stages of development. Evolution & Development, 21(1), 16–30. https://doi.org/10.1111/ede.12275